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Doula to Doula : Talking Sleep with Parents

For the past several months, I’ve had the really wonderful opportunity of teaching Infant Sleep Basics for Doulas with Cornerstone Doula Training. Though I wasn’t trained by Cornerstone apart from their Nutrition for Midwives course, I’ve worked with many doulas trained by them and have been so impressed. I knew I had big shoes to fill in being taken on as one of their instructors — especially on a topic as loaded as sleep training.

Well, so far it’s been awesome and I’ve been so thrilled to be apart of so many doulas’ expanding knowledge. One doula-in-training reached out to me recently about a particular struggle and the back and forth exchange was deeply resonate with what I hear from many other doulas and parents in my sleep training practice that I asked her if I could share it. Luckily, she said “yes” and so here it is! I hope this sheds come insight into the common struggles of new parents and their in-home care takers in navigating the tricky territory of sleep support.

J : I run into a situation frequently where a baby 1-6 months will SCREAM and fuss as soon as you take them into a sleeping area, or they know it’s going to be time for a nap. Which has resulted in parents holding them for naps etc. Is there any way around this? These babies also only sleep one 20-45 minute cycle at MOST. And maybe even just 1/2 naps for a 12 hour day. 

I would appreciate any insight you have! Thank you!! 

Me : Easiest solution - have them sleep wherever. Stick a basket in the living room. Who cares? They are responding to some other stress than the room itself since they have no object permanence anyhow. But anyway, infants can just sleep wherever.  Or they can start staying in the room with baby longer with a hand on baby’s chest. Check out Kim West’s Sleep Mommy Shuffle. 

If they insist on baby being in another room :

Is the baby swaddled? - They will transfer better if so and will sleep more soundly if they are not put down till at least a few minutes into the deep sleep phase. 

What sort of space are they sleeping in-basket, crib, etc? - Trying to transfer baby into many sleep spaces can be challenging since they are often quite deep (triggering a baby’s reflexes to stir), too large (messing up baby’s vertigo and causing them to feel alone and thus “unsafe,” which will impact deep sleep), they may need to be closer to a human body for the sake of developing their biorhythms and there is really no need for an infant to sleep in a separate space since they can’t sleep well on their own and don’t have object permanence to cause a “bad habit.”

Are the parents generally anxious or stressed around sleep rituals in a way that might cause overstimulation in the baby? - often this becomes a vicious cycle where parents and care takers feel pressure about sleep and then start routines with anxiety which these primal little blobs soak up like sponges, causing more stress and crying, and ever onward till someone caves. They can either accept the need to hold/carry baby for some naps (which is certainly an ok thing to do  if it works for their life) or accept that it will take some adjustment if they are not thriving. Adjustment can be gentle or difficult so it’s a balancing game that will be different for each family. I’ve worked with many families who thought it was near impossible to get babe into their own sleep space without using harsher methods, but time (TIME TIME TIME) and observation and gentle care for everyone involved (and for me at least, Glenn Harrold in my earbuds) did the trick 99% of the time. 

Do the parents do a lot of “development” activities in between naps? - you can help them see that those aren’t really necessary and can overstimulate baby and make it harder to get them settled for sleep. Two articles to look into on this: Leave Those Kids Alone from the Atlantic and this one.

My advice to you and family is to keep tuning into baby over reaching for quick fixes or giving up. Both lead to more confusion and suffering most of the time. 

Hang in there, this is normal. You’ll develop your rhythm and approach to all this as you hang with more babes and families and see the possible pitfalls and solutions. 

J : I think the root of the question is really just WHAT is normal? 

I know some babies who have slept through the night at 6 weeks without crying and others just never want to be put down. 

I feel like in our culture people feel it is abnormal for babies to want to be held and co-sleep. Do you have any resources that are nice and REALISTIC about what you can actually expect from a baby?  And what do healthy sleep "habits" actually look like? I totally understand if you cannot answer these questions! I am happy to read articles or books or listen to podcasts, it just seems everyone is either so far on the left or far on the right when it comes to what a baby sleep should actually look like and who qualifies as a "baby". 

Me : So pretty much everything is normal. That’s what crushes parents. There are going to be LOADS of circumstances where you try everything under the sun and nothing seems to help. We are a culture obsessed with diagnosing and “solving” things, but that doesn’t totally jive with the primal blob nature of infancy. 

Over time you will feel desperate in some way and it will lead to a cool trick or some deeper understanding that helps you better communicate these things to parents. If you fight the urge to make promises, rely on crappy information, or feel that your role is to give definitive answers to things that aren’t actually “problems,” you and the folks you serve will be better off. It’s hard when word of mouth and testimonials are such a big part of our business, but you have to keep in mind that you’re teaching parents to be parents, not acting as a contractor mending a collapsed wall. Our help is more subtle and nuanced and can take time to be appreciated or understood — even within ourselves. 

Instead of furthering the bullshit idea that there are “right” and “wrong” ways to sleep/hold/feed/rest/care/bond/teach/parent, keep pushing the notion of filtering and thriving : Filter through information + Pick things that help your family thrive (regardless of the other book sitting next to the one you picked that says the opposite thing than what you’re doing). HARD and EASY are relative. 

This isn’t the same as doing nothing. Making shifts and observing then adjusting when folks aren’t thriving is a great thing. You being there to normalize that, give options, validate choices, and take some of the physical load off implementation is priceless. 

This all sounds floofy, trust me, I’m a legal researcher who pushes evidence constantly, but the truth is no matter how deep you dig into trying to find a solid answer with newborns, they exist on some other plane not quite here on earth, talking to faeries as my Irish grandmothers would say, and so logic doesn’t always prove solid. And almost always, the answer is be gentle with them, be gentle with yourself, be firm in your ideas of what is necessary to thrive, and give it time. 


I hope that helped give some insight into my process of postpartum and sleep consultation work and gives some validation to the struggles you might be facing as a doula or new parent. You’re not alone in not being able to feel confident in navigating what is “normal” right from the go.

Books are currently open for all consultation services, including sleep training. I have two sleep classes scheduled at Mini Mint Studios in Santa Cruz next month — May 9th from 1-3 for parents and May 13th 4-7 for doulas and midwives. You can register for both on my Contact page.

More about my sleep training philosophy

I am really not on board with formal sleep training before 4 months at MINIMUM, but more likely 6 months. And even then, I only advocate for “cry it out” methods when there is some clear lack of thriving in one or more of the family members and only when other options have been exhausted.

ahhh the sleepy baby and his lovie

ahhh the sleepy baby and his lovie

What I'm offering is sleep education that actually has a strong focus on helping families put off sleep "training," understanding that it's not biologically appropriate and then explaining why, while still leaving them with some resources to hopefully get more rest. My sessions / classes focus on going over the basics of infant sleep patterns + cues and how feeding / digestion / overstimulation can affect these things. It's trying to cut out the stress around sleep by giving healthy and realistic expectations and some tricks for gentle sleep routines (that are often more for parents in the first months than a baby that can't be trained to notice anyhow). 

My hope is by helping families access high quality resources (versus opinion based books and blogs), have someone they can touch base with easily, and someone in home working with them one-on-one to help them understand their baby's unique patterns and needs, they can have a less stressful approach to sleep issues and can maybe avoid sleep training entirely. 

Honestly, I've talked every person who's contacted me about sleep training before 6 months out of it, so that feels good. Most families are starting some sort of drive toward scheduled sleep starting too early and it's a huge reason why I've started to do this education more since I was getting so many parents emailing me in pregnancy or with 2-3 week olds asking to be sleep trained.

Too many parents are getting bad intel about how you either need to get on the ball with scheduled and formal sleep training at such and such an age or else your baby will be developmentally stunted, not independent, a crappy sleeper, and stuck in your bed full of bad habits till their in middle school. There is not such a binary in the process of choosing what adjustments you want to make in getting babe sleeping longer and more independently. I want to be able to help guide parents through their options (not make decisions for them or tell them they’ve failed) so they feel intuitively connected to the needs and development of their children and confident that they’re making the most appropriate decisions for their own families.


If you are interested in getting some more education and support around infant sleep issues, there are a number of ways to access my care : Hourly consults, daytime observation and support packages, overnight observation and support packages, bringing me to a new parent group, or taking one of my longer courses. Check out my Infant Sleep Support page to learn more about each option.

…AND! I teach doulas about infant sleep basics, too! If you are part of a doula group or training organization and want to chat about these exciting and informative classes aimed at giving postpartum doulas more resources for supporting families through this minefield of misinformation, judgement, and anxiety please contact me.

cute picture. terrible swaddle. i have thoughts here.

cute picture. terrible swaddle. i have thoughts here.

Call Your Girlfriend -- I'm Doing Virtual Consults!

Here to tell you about my phone and video consultation services!

Okay okay okay, truth be told, I HATE talking on the phone. I don’t even like FaceTime chats except to see my baby nephew so this has been a stretch for me. BUT I loving it.

image via  Mere Street

image via Mere Street

I was asked to start doing phone consultations by a former client who is building a network of experts to reach Chinese families around the globe who are trying to find more holistic parenting resources. It started as short video workshops (that was challenging enough for me as a rambler) and merged into phone consultations for small groups of parents interested in holistic sleep education. That lead to phone consultations for doula contract writing, prenatal education with families outside my services areas, and more. It’s inspired me to keep going.


I’m going to start offering almost all of my services virtually from now on -- Well Woman Consultations, Pregnancy Consultations, Postpartum Prep Consultations, Sleep Support Consultations, and Doula Contract Writing Consultations and Classes.


Here’s what each might look like :

Well woman consultations :

After you reach out about wanting to work with me to find a more tailor-fit approach to your hormonal and reproductive health care, I’ll send you one of my whopping 10 page intake forms to fill out and send back to me. You can sign up for 1+ hour of support over the phone or video, we’ll pick a day and time, and that’ll be when we can go over your needs and wishes for care.


After we chat, I’ll do a bit of research and reach out to my network for good recommendations in your area and send you a detailed email with everything you need. If you want to keep working with me, we can do so in the same manner on and hour-to-hour basis or you can jump into one of my annual or 6-month packages for further support.

We’ll cover everything from nutrition to seeking a primary care provider to navigating tricky hormonal issues to birth control options, and more.

I’m very dedicated to working with young persons and their parents/guardians to help them navigate the transition from pediatric into reproductive/gynecological health care that’s supportive, inclusive, expansive, respectful of the enormity of these age transformations, and doesn’t scare them out of routine care. We can work as a team and have private sessions so everyone feels comfortable and connected in this process. Privacy, compassion, and empowerment are the keys here and I’d love to be a guide for you and/or your child in this process.


Pregnancy consultations :

These can work the same as my in-person package options where you can sign up for a 2 hour consult at any point in pregnancy or the full 10 month support package. After you let me know what might work best for you (and if you start with the 2 hours and want to jump into a larger package, that fee will just be transferred over), I’ll send you a detailed intake form so you can let me know about your pregnancy journey so far and fill me in on what I might be able to help you with going forward.

For some families, you’re just looking for extra information on a specific topic like choosing a care provider, GBS testing, nutrition, finding a doula, home or birth center birth vs hospital birth options, how to find and interpret high quality research and information, information on comfort measures in birth, or other singular topics.

Other families want to get the support they would traditionally get from an independent midwife (minus the clinical testing) that they aren’t able to access for any reason and want to have me fill in a lot of the huge gaps left in our maternal care system.

With ten years of experience supporting pregnant persons in all sorts of ways (childbirth educator, doula, midwifery student, infant care specialist, researcher, doula trainer) and in many different states, countries, and settings, I’m here for all of it! If you feel like my style is the best fit for you, or you feel like you’re not finding what you need in your area at this time, let me help you virtually!


Postpartum Consultations :

Feeling like you’re not getting the resources on what to expect once baby is home? Feeling like you’re getting a lot of conflicting information or information too focused on risk and fear and opinion? Wanting an infant and mama/birthing person healing crash course done on your own time and with your specific family’s needs in mind? Let’s set up a call or video to go over what you need to know. This also can be done as a one-time 2 hour session or as part of the broader packages.

Unlike traditional newborn basics or breastfeeding classes now widely offered, these consultations don’t follow a standard system. Instead, they are focused on the concerns you have individually and specific to what you feel you’re not getting. We can set these up before baby arrives (ideally) or up to 4 months after baby is here. This can be a truly awesome baby shower gift!

I offer discounts for group consultations, so if you have a few friends or a parent’s group of expectant/new folks due around your same time (minimum 4 participants), the price is dropped to $20 per participant per hour.


Sleep Consultations :

Wanting some basics in infant sleep expectations? Not sure you want to sleep train or what sleep training even entails? Wanting a holistic and personalized approach to discussing sleep difficulties without fear or judgement? Need a point person on standby for those crazy weeks of transitioning sleep schedules? That’s me!

Lack of sleep is one of the number one challenges parents face in the first few months with a new babe. There is no way to make this obstacle disappear -- it’s part of the process, sorry to tell you. However, so much of the sleep training information floating around is not routed in good science or good practice and often leaves families feeling more stressed and tired. This often leads to them either ditching their goals for compassionate sleep adjustment sooner than they’d like, or makes them feel like giving up even trying to get babe to sleep on their own. There is a middle path, friends!

For better or worse, this middle ground takes a lot of extra support, guidance, and respect for nuance. Rosewood consultations aim for realistic, quality information-driven, and non judgemental discussions around safe, healthy, and lengthier sleep options. This isn’t a promise of X hours or a leave your baby to scream bullet point plan, no-sir no-thanks.

There is an option to have a 2 hour basic rundown of common sleep issues and information you can access while still pregnant, or you can reach out to me once baby is here and you feel you need more advice, either as a 2 hour consult or as part of a larger package based on your needs. This can also be a group virtual class at the $20 per person per hour rate (for at least 4 registered participants).


Doula Contract Consultations :

Let’s face it, most doula trainings leave you totally in the dark about how to write a contract that really protects you or supports your individual practice.

With a one-on-one contract consultation and edit, we can work together to go over the basics of contract writing (I send you my full how-to booklet once you register), using your contract to set up healthy and cooperative expectations for yourself and your clients, how long to keep a contract, what goes in your contract vs on your website or handouts, myth-busting scary legal language and legal fears, and how this practice can evolve and grow and be a benefit to your wider doula community.

Individual virtual edits are 2 hours of prep on my end going over your material as-is, 2 hours of virtual meeting time, and 2 email follow ups built in with the option of adding more at a low hourly rate.

Virtual group classes can be done at an hourly rate of $100 per hour for any size group. I’ve loved talking to doula groups and collectives around the country about how to use this exercise together to create better contracts and support one another in this often difficult work.  


Want to bring me to your group or training organization in person? I’d love that! We can chatrates and options, so please reach out.

Rates for virtual consults are the same as in person consultations at this time and can be found on my Services and Doula pages. As always, sliding scale and some trades are options to keep this type of support accessible in many areas.

If you are part of a parent’s network or group and think I’d be a good fit for one of your gatherings, please reach out! I love discussing specific topics families want more information on like holistic sleep advice, environmental parenting, choosing a care provider, finding a doula, and more.

If you are a doula group and want me to speak (virtually or if possible in person) about one of my specific focus areas, LET’S CHAT! I do it all the time and love meeting and teaching doulas from all over.




Plastic Free Breast Feeding

I’m on a plastic-free kick lately. Wanting to share so much more with the folks I work with, both expectant families and folks I see about general health care concerns.

Freezing-Breast-Milk-Mason-Jars.jpg

I was here thinking, probably like many of you, that switching to silicone was a good step. However, I got schooled a bit on silicone today by my work pal, Friday Apaliski, The Sustainability Concierge, and she helped me realize a few key details about certain storage options for breast milk. Turns out, glass and stainless steel are still the way to go, from start to finish if you’re going to be pumping, storing, and feeding through bottles. Silicone is a bit better than the thin plastics used in most baby items, but new research is showing how silicone items might also be leeching chemicals (and most silicone-based storage item and bottle have plastic fillers in them) when heated AND when frozen.

Some elements of switching to glass or steel take some effort, but mostly, you won’t notice a difference. Here are a few easy options :

plastic free ice cube storage
  • Stainless steel ice cube trays are more expensive than plastic or silicone, but are much more durable, just as easy (or easier) to use, don’t have any of the harmful chemicals that can get into your precious milk, and will last a lifetime. An investment in two trays should cover a good supply of milk and will carry over to freezing prepared foods for your baby when they’re eating solids or just as regular old ice cube trays. See the advice below on grease pencils for labeling…You can buy stainless steel ice cube trays for milk storage on Life Without Plastic and the Plastic Free Shop and probably loads of local stores.


  • If you want to store milk in glass jars in the freezer, you have to buy glass jars that run straight up and down. This means 12oz jam jars, pint jars, and 1.5 pint jars only. One case of any of these should suit you. Hopefully, you’ve picked some up for homemade broth and quick pickles to help fight off GBS in pregnancy so you already have some, but if not, you can find them at most hardware and grocery stores and all over the place online (I suggest NOT Amazon, if you can help it). Friday suggested putting the jarred milk in the freezer with the lid off till it’s frozen to ensure it can easily expand without cracking the glass. She used to mark the flat part of the lids with a grease pencil with the date of pumping. You can use any type of glass jar, including this Mason Bottle, if you are leaving the milk in the fridge.


  • You can fit your glass bottles right on to your breast pump! No need to pump into plastic and fiddle with transporting it into something else, unless you are freezing what you are pumping. Easy-peasy. No need to ever purchase ANY plastic bottles for babe. Here’s the rundown of the Best Glass Bottles according to The Bump. Ideally, you can switch away from plastic nipples, too, like these natural rubber nipples from EcoViking.

Image via Friday Apaliski

Image via Friday Apaliski

Well, there they are…just a few easy steps and for the same cost and ease as the plastic alternatives. I’m happy to help you set up this plastic-free system through some postpartum consultations or through a separate consultations focused primarily on how to have a plastic-free, environmentally considerate, and healthier plan for postpartum. I can do these in-person in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley or online anywhere. You can also check in with Friday if you want someone to do your green baby registry for you! How cool is that?

If you want more information on why you should switch away from plastics for your baby’s milk storage, check out these links :

How a Postpartum Preparation Consultation Can Save You Tons

postpartum preparation

I’ve been a birth and postpartum doula for almost a decade. In that time (I’m going to sound like a grandma here), I’ve seen an enormous spike in the amount of unnecessary junk parents are told that they “can’t live without” once baby arrives. Oh, and of course you need a 5x week night nurse, right?

NOPE.

I can’t believe the amount of money and time new parents spend on things that frankly aren’t that helpful, while not having many of their primary needs met and stress only amplified. Like, come on, a $1,500 bassinet that plugs your baby’s wiggles into the iCloud and sets off an alarm when your baby coughs?! Ummmm no thank you, Black Mirror.

Believe it or not, as a human race, we’re good at making babies. That’s why there are 7+billion of us wandering around. American parents are necessarily “bad” at making babies or keeping our babies alive, either. We don’t need fancy machines, ten types of bottles, babies taking a bunch of supplements, or apps full of useless data to help us take care of our little ones.

Now, I am a particularly low-stuff person in general. I don’t like clutter and I don’t like being surrounded by plastic. I realize that many of my clients are not that way in their lives, generally. And some of these gadgets might have made their friend’s lives a bit better when their kids arrived, so I’m not discounting that. However, I do take a lot of issue with the wastefulness of new parent life as well as the very legitimate health and mental well being concerns that I see arise from the contemporary parenting culture. And IT’S SO EXPENSIVE!

san francisco baby

Trying to market my postpartum counseling services is tricky. I am aware of what a luxury it is to have a private class from a doula on the nit-picky parts of postpartum. However, I feel passionately (and know from experience) that families are really seeking something like this. They are bombarded with so much information and no clue what to take in and what to trash. And new parenting culture is so so so full of judgement and risk talk and fear. Paying $35-75 an hour for an expert to help you in your home is seen as exorbitant, though it’s seen as a necessary and lacking component of a healthy childbirth experience in evidence-based studies and in countries where this sort of care is recognized as valuable and included in standard care. I can say honestly that most of my clients are spending as much on me as they spend on stuff that sits in a pile unused or is used just once or twice in the first several months of their child’s life. I want to help families not go down that expensive and wasteful rabbit hole, while helping to connect them with the type of care they really need by a care provider who is in line with their visions of parenting.

My recommended package, which includes meeting you in person in pregnancy, costs $450. Let’s see how easy it is to spend that same amount on unnecessary items:

  • The Lotus Bassinet is $300. I have never seen a baby sleep comfortably in this (newborn babies DON’T sleep in giant, flat contraptions) and it’s huge and in the way for most families. I’ve never worked with a family who hasn’t switched away from this sleeper after a week or two.

  • The Frida Baby Bundle of Joy set is $50. All I can say about the Frida company is they have mastered marketing. I have strong opinions against nose suction after growing up surrounded by speech pathologists and strongly urge my clients to use gentler methods of booger extraction. No baby has ever died of a booger, after all. And the nail trimmer…an emory board from a drug store is $0.30. The Windi is great…if your baby is on heavy supplementation and hasn’t pooed in two weeks ONLY. This kit mostly stays in a pile of half open boxes in the homes I am in daily. It’s an expensive waste.

  • The least expensive bottle sterilizers I could find were $20 and most families I’ve seen have the $40-80 versions around. Oh Lordy, do I have thoughts on these. You’re putting large amounts of melted plastic directly into your baby’s body with absolutely no known benefits in risk reduction from harmful bacteria. Trust me here, I have sought out evidence to prove me wrong about infections and sterilization of bottles. Often. Over the course of a decade. I have searched and come up empty handed. However, the links to how harmful it is to have leeched plastics in our food is compelling and long standing, and there is a good amount of evidence on why we should limited plastic exposure specifically in infants. Yet, every family I work with has a sterilizing system of some sort, even though not a one has been able to tell me where they heard they should be doing this or why. Most people have at least two systems in their homes or one giant one, so we’ll put the cost of this at $50 conservatively.

  • Wipe Warmers are about $25. What nonsense these are. Little mold factories. Your baby doesn’t give a crap (pun intended) about the wipes being warm. These are hot, moist, expensive, plastic, toxic wastes of time. One more thing to worry about filling and cleaning for nothing.

  • We’re already easily at $425, so I’ll just have the extra $25 be unnecessary clothes and toys your infant will never wear or use, but you will inevitably purchase or be given.

That was easy, huh? I intentionally picked things that are on the lower range of what families spend on infant items well before baby arrives. It’s not that uncommon that the $450 is spent on just one item most parents will never even get around to using. This is why amazing stores like Chloe’s Closet even exist. I can help you find free or low-cost options through insurance coverage, as well as helping direct you toward more conscious options (and even connect you with the amazing Friday Apaliski and her environmental concierge work).

You need very very little in terms of stuff to have a comfortable and safe postpartum. What you WILL need and what is often lacking in postpartum support comes from care providers. That $150 bottle sterilizer could get you 3-5 hours of postpartum doula support that could be the critical thing for getting over a breastfeeding hump, connecting you to a pelvic floor specialist, help prevent you from spending 4 hours one day rushing to the pediatrician for a very normal infant situation, prevent you from getting mastitis from engorgement, or teach you fundamental sleep tricks that get your baby napping more regularly so you can nap too. Guess what, she’ll probably wash your bottles, too, maybe even sterilize them in a pot of boiling water on your stove, if you really want that.

Another way my consultations can help you save major bucks is through counseling you through finding a postpartum doula who fits your style and needs and then giving you realistic expectations for how dense of a contract you’ll need. Even if you have all the money in the world to throw at a doula, and even if it seems amazing to have someone around the clock with you, there are a number of reasons why you don’t need to spend a college tuition on postpartum doula coverage in the first six months. For too many, this is the vision in mind when people talk about postpartum doula support — that’s it’s dense and expensive and too much of a luxury — so parents either go overboard seeking the same coverage they heard worked for someone else and being disappointed or just forgo care all together.

There truly exists a system of doula care that works for each family. Working with me and utilizing my decade of experience as well as my connections within the wider doula community, we can break down your needs and what to expect from care to find the perfect fit for you. Quite honestly, I talk most people out of this crazy dense coverage, saving families an enormous amount of money, and linking doulas to families who are less likely to terminate contracts sooner Adding hours on later is always an option — even if not entirely with the same doula — and contract disputes are just too much of a nightmare for all involved. I teach contract writing workshops to doulas and have heard a myriad of good and bad experiences and feel really equipped to help out on the parenting side of this equation. I’d say I save families $1,500 in doula coverage on average and there hasn’t been a single doula who’s taken my class who hasn’t reported back that they used their contract adjustments in a fee resolution within 6 months of working with me. I want to help trouble shoot these concerns sooner than later for everyone’s sake.

Asking for this service within your baby registry or getting a few friends together to have a class with me can save you a bundle, too. My speaking rates are $100 an hour for up to 10 people and can be split however works best within your group. If your little one is already here and you’re feeling overwhelmed and lost, I have a discounted package for you, too. I even offer package that focus specifically on sleep support — aka every parents #1 question and concern in postpartum.

Hope you’ll meet with me and that I can help you have a joyful, empowered, and less anxiety-riddled entry way into new parenting.